Rest in peace, Jacque Fresco—gone but never forgotten!

Here are a few Jacque Fresco quotes to remember him by and to inspire us all to work toward a better world: 

“I don’t get upset if people think I’m crazy. If you go to a mental hospital and someone calls you a name, would you get upset? Of course not. Well, that’s the way I think about the world. They don’t know any better.”

“It’s your own expectations that hurt you. Not the world you live in. Whatever happens in the world is real. What you think should happen is unreal. So people are hurt by their expectations. You know, you’re not disappointed by the world, you are disappointed by your own projections.” 

“Our main problem is a lack of understanding of what it means to be human and that we are not separate from nature.”

“Democracy is a con game. It’s a word invented to placate people to make them accept a given institution. All institutions sing, ‘We are free.’ The minute you hear ‘freedom’ and ‘democracy’, watch out…because in a truly free nation, no one has to tell you you’re free.” 

“’What is the meaning of life?’ What is consciousness and the mind? Why am I here? What is my relationship to God and the universe?’ These questions have been asked for centuries, but they are irrelevant to achieving social progress. These are unanswerable questions because they don’t have referents in the real world. The posing of such ambiguous questions doesn’t express concern for fellow human beings, or a desire to elevate their condition. Such musings are gibberish in terms of practicality, and as impotent as wailing over an injured person instead of seeking medical attention for them.”

“If you love someone and they want to leave, you help them pack. That’s love.”

“I didn’t want to teach my kid how to read, so I used to read to him at night and close the book at the most interesting part. He said, ‘What happened then, Daddy?’ I said, ‘If you learn to read, you can find out. I’m too tired to read. I’ll read to you tomorrow.’ So, he had a need to want to learn how to read. Don’t teach children how to read. Don’t teach them mathematics. Give them a reason to want it. In school, they’re working ass-backward.”

“If you’re shipwrecked on an island with 10 million dollars and your wife has gold and diamonds, but there’s no water, no arable land, no fish, you have nothing. Money is a ‘nothing’ thing.”

“We have the technology to build a global paradise on earth, and at the same time, we have the power to end life as we know it. I am a futurist. I cannot predict the actual future—only what it can be if we manage the earth and its resources intelligently.”

“Either we learn to live together in full cooperation or we will cause our own extinction.”

Jacque_Fresco_and_lemon_tree

WOMEN’S POWER!

          1c1c531d53e142e99c43857f575d7254Tomyris, or Queen Tomiri, was a Massagetean ruler who reigned over the Massagetae, a Scythianpastoral-nomadic confederation of Central Asia east of the Caspian Sea, in parts of modern-day TurkmenistanAfghanistan, western Uzbekistan, and southern Kazakhstan. Tomyris led her armies to defend against an attack by Cyrus the Great of the Achaemenid Empire, and defeated and killed him in 530 BC (although this is debatable since Herodotus mentions that this was only one of many stories relating Cyrus the Great’s death).

According to the accounts of Greek historians, Cyrus was victorious in his initial assault on the Massagetae. His advisers suggested laying a trap for the pursuing Scythians: the Persians left behind them an apparently abandoned camp, containing a rich supply of wine. The pastoral Scythians were not used to drinking wine—”their favored intoxicants were hashish and fermented mare’s milk”—and they drank themselves into a stupor. The Persians attacked while their opponents were incapacitated, defeating the Massagetae forces, and capturing Tomyris’ son, Spargapises, the general of her army. Of the one third of the Massagetae forces that fought, there were more captured than killed. According to Herodotus, Spargagises coaxed Cyrus into removing his bonds, thus allowing him to commit suicide while in Persian captivity.

Tomyris sent a message to Cyrus denouncing his treachery, and with all her forces, images challenged him to a second battle. In the fight that ensued, the Massagetae got the upper hand, and the Persians were defeated with high casualties. According to Herodotus, Cyrus was killed and Tomyris had his corpse beheaded and then crucified, and shoved his head into a wineskin filled with human blood. She was reportedly quoted as saying, “I warned you that I would quench your thirst for blood, and so I shall”

       DO YOU JUSTIFY SUCH KILLING?

THE REIGN OF BEAUTIES!

c5618764e44f19db17df3ab20dd3018bHatshepsut was one of the most powerful women in the ancient world. She was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Ancient Egypt and she ruled longer than any other woman in Egyptian history.

Hatshepsut was married to her sickly half brother, Thutmose II, and the two of them 4a3c97e7408543d4971253456bfe709bbegan to co-rule after the death of their father, Thutmose I, in 1492 BC In 1479 BC, Thutmose II died and Hatshepsut continued to rule by herself until her own death in 1458 BC

It is believed by many Egyptologists and historians that Hatshepsut was one of Ancient Egypt’s most successful monarchs. She commissioned many building projects and reestablished trade networks that had been disrupted by the Hyksos invaders of the Second Intermediate Period. Hatshepsut also led a large-scale expedition to the Land of Punt, a wealthy and sophisticated country to the south of Egypt. Hatshepsut is also believed to have led successful military campaigns in Nubia, the Levant, and Syria during her reign.

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